Who was Scotland Yards first female detective?

The secret of Madame Yin

A first-class Victorian thriller that presents interesting characters, great locations and an excellent picture of the time in addition to an exciting case. A story that should have lasted a few hundred pages, if you like.

Content:
Celeste Summersteen works for a Chicago detective agency and is commissioned to accompany the young Dorothea Ellingsford to London in 1877. Dorothea returns to her family after a long stay with her aunt. However, since one of her friends was murdered, Celeste is supposed to protect Dorothea and find out who the killer was.
A little later, the corpse of a size from the London Underground is fished out of the Thames, which has the same death characteristics as Dorothea's girlfriend.
Celeste ... more

A first-class Victorian thriller that presents interesting characters, great locations and an excellent picture of the time in addition to an exciting case. A story that should have lasted a few hundred pages, if you like.

Content:
Celeste Summersteen works for a Chicago detective agency and is commissioned to accompany the young Dorothea Ellingsford to London in 1877. Dorothea returns to her family after a long stay with her aunt. However, since one of her friends was murdered, Celeste is supposed to protect Dorothea and find out who the killer was.
A little later, the corpse of a size from the London Underground is fished out of the Thames, which has the same death characteristics as Dorothea's girlfriend.
Celeste has no choice but to work with Inspector Robert Edwards of Scotland Yard. A connection of purpose that stands on shaky legs, but the common goal of preventing further murders can bridge some of the differences.

Setting and style:
Nathan Winters does an excellent job of bringing the full spectrum of Victorian London to life for the readers. From the noble houses full of servants and wealth to the darkest, bad smelling corners of the city. From the docks to Whitechapel to the better neighborhoods. Every place is animated with suitable characters and descriptions of the surroundings.
We can see the action from the point of view of the two main characters.

Characters:
A female detective seems to be a world first, especially for the Victorian Londoner. So Celeste has to fight hard for her respect, but thanks to this position she has many opportunities that elude the strict London structures. An ideal means of identification, which shows the man's world with charm and shrewdness that one should reckon with them.
Inspector Edwards belongs to this man's world, and he doesn't think much of working with a woman. It takes time until they can face each other reasonably at eye level, but since as a police officer he has quite a few other investigative approaches anyway, the parallel investigations are more beneficial than harmful. In his own, somewhat brittle and stubborn way, I quickly grew to love Edwards.
Both fit perfectly into their time and are surrounded by characters who could hardly be more Victorian either.
Of course, there must also be perpetrators in a crime thriller. And this time there are not too few, because thanks to the different locations and the connections behind them, there is a lot of rabble around, which makes it difficult for the investigators. There is also a worthy wire-puller for the eponymous secret, which I of course silently ignore here.

History:
A case that leads to the opium hell of London, includes power struggles between criminal gangs and is surrounded by a sad story that could hardly be more tragic. All perfect ingredients to captivate and carry away the reader. Everything is logically comprehensible and told in an atmospheric way. It's hard to put the book aside because you just want to know how things are going with Celeste and Robert. All the better that the chance of further history of the two is preserved.

Conclusion:
A thriller that took me perfectly into an exciting time in British history. I can recommend it to history and crime fans without further ado. A plot that can keep up in tension and density with everything else that was going on at the time. I'm already looking forward to the next 400-page encounter with the characters.