Mosquitoes bite less in winter

Myth refutedMosquitoes and Co. is the cold no matter

"When the winter is cold and it freezes, we get fewer mosquitoes and wasps in the summer." One hears again and again. But it is wrong.

With the current frosty temperatures, it feels good to think about summer every now and then. When it's warm outside and we're still sitting outside on the balcony in the evening. But one thing does not appear in these romantic ideas: to be bitten by mosquitoes.

Lately it has been quite frosty - sometimes it was below zero during the day. When making small talk about the cold temperatures, the following sentence is often used: "If the winter was cold, the mosquitoes stay away in the summer." Optionally also: "... the wasps stay away in summer."

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Unfortunately, that's a myth. This applies to both mosquitoes and wasps. What matters more is what the weather is like in spring.

Spring decides the mosquito population

Mosquitoes build up their population in several waves. It is ideal for them when the spring is humid and warm. Mosquitoes lay their eggs in small bodies of water or in puddles. The more larvae hatch, the more can lay eggs again in the next batch.

This winter the mosquitoes will survive just as well as the winters before. They can easily withstand temperatures of up to minus 20 degrees. Mosquitoes crawl into cracks - for example in the bark of a tree - when it gets cold and freeze themselves. The low temperatures cannot harm them because they have stored an antifreeze.

Wasp population grows in warmth and drought

It's a little different with wasps. They don't need water to reproduce. However, just like the mosquitoes, they have to rebuild their colonies in spring. To do this, the queen, who is the only one who survived, goes out and looks for a suitable place to build a wasp state. In order for it to grow, however, different conditions are required than with the mosquito. Moisture is bad for wasps, because then the brood will develop a mold problem.

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