Marry Mennonites non-Mennonites

 

Mennonite marriages and mixed marriages

 MUB. Background and remarks. MUB. Emigration of Russian mennonites to Germany in the years 1964-2008. MUB. Last names of Russian mennonites who emigrated to Germany. Overview. MUB. First names of Russian mennonites who emigrated to Germany. Overview MUB. Last names of Russian mennonites who emigrated to Germany (sorted alphabetically). MUB. First names of Russian mennonites who emigrated to Germany (sorted alphabetically). MUB. Places in the USSR or CIS from which Russian mennonites emigrated (sorted alphabetically). MUB. Places in the USSR or CIS from which Russian mennonites emigrated (sorted by year). MUB. Places in Germany where Russian mennonites lived immediately after the resettlement.   I want to say right away that these data on mixed marriages are scientifically incorrect. In the database "MUB" the nationality is not given at all. And the information that this person belongs to this nationality or ethnic group is only derived from the family name by me. I am aware that such a deduction can lead to incorrect results. Even separating Mennonite and German family names is difficult. Today we know which names occur in the Mennonite (see The distribution of Mennonite names in the "Grandma 5"), but some of them were also common among Germans, e. B. Schmidt, Becker, Schulz et al. Even among the Russian names you can find some that come from the Asian (Islamic) area or occur e.g. B. Izmailov. Nevertheless, I hope that these data give a rough overview of the proportion of Mennonite marriages and mixed marriages in the MUB database.  When I speak of Mennonites here, I do not mean the religion, but the membership of the ethnic group (or peoples) of the Russian Mennonites.  All nations in the database were divided into 4 groups: Mennonites, Germans, Russians and Asian nations. Mennonites: in this group are all names that in my opinion occur with Mennonites. A small part of German names can also be included here. Russians: besides Russians, there are also other European nations in this group - Ukrainians, Belarusians, Moldovans, Estonians, Latvians, Lithuanians and Greeks. Asian nations: Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Uzbeks, Tatars, Armenians, Georgians and Koreans.  The part of the database that describes the marriages is structured as follows. At the beginning (left) the head of the family, mostly the man, and on the right the spouse, mostly the woman. But it happens e.g. B. If a woman is divorced, or a widow, she is also on the left in the database, as the head of the family. Sometimes, in mixed marriages, but much less often, the woman is the head of the family, even if the marriage is not divorced but the children have adopted the woman's maiden name as their family name. This information, nationality (or ethnicity) of the head of the family and his spouse, is shown in the table below:     
Mixed marriages in the data of the "Mennonite Resettler Care" (according to family head).
Mennonite - German marriage
Mennonite - Asian marriage
Mennonite - Mennonite marriage 
Mennonite - Russian marriage
Mennonite - unknown  
German - German marriage
 
German - Asian marriage
German - Mennonite marriage
German - Russian marriage
German - unknown  
Asians - German marriage
Asians - Mennonite marriage
Asians - Russian marriage
Asians - unknown  
Russian - German marriage
Russian - Asian marriage
Russian - Mennonite marriage
russian - russian marriage 
Russian - unknown  
     For example: "Mennonite - German marriage" means the head of the family (left in the database) is a Mennonite and his spouse is a German. "German - Mennonite marriage" - the head of the family (left in the database) is a German and his spouse is a Mennonite. In the third column these numbers are shown next to each other for comparison, I hope that one can infer very closely from this whether men or women have often chosen a partner from another group.  If we put all the data from the table above ("Mennonite - German marriage" and "German - Mennonite marriage") together, we get this table:  

Proportion of Mennonite marriages and mixed marriages in the data of the "Mennonite resettlement care".

 
1Mennonite - Mennonite marriage
2Mennonite - German marriage
3Mennonite - Russian marriage
4Mennonites - unknown
5Mennonite - Asian marriage
6Non-Mennonites - Non-Mennonites
7Non-Mennonites - unknown
 Together everyone
 Together: Mennonites - Non-Mennonites (2-5)
     This data looks like this graphically:     
    First of all, when looking at these data, the relatively small proportion of almost 43% where both spouses have a Mennonite name is surprising. If you consider, as I said above, that there is also a small part of German names under these Mennonite names, this part is actually even smaller, albeit insignificant. We have 50% where at least one spouse has a Mennonite name. Together it is 93% of all marriages in the Mennonite blood that can be considered as Mennonites or descendants of Mennonites. But there are also 7% in which nothing at all suggests a Mennonite origin. How did this relatively large share come about? I have two declarations for this. Some of them are people who are not descendants of Mennonites, but who have joined this belief system at some point, or have been identified as such by the staff of the "MUB". The other part are descendants of Mennonites in the 2nd (or even 3rd) generation. For example, a Mennonite woman marries a non-Mennonite and the children are given that non-Mennonite name as well         1. Database of the "Mennonite Resettler Care".