Is echo a type of reflected sound

How is an echo created?

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When sound hits an obstacle.

Air waves: Tones and noises set air particles in motion. These movements create waves that are invisible in the air and slosh in all directions. When such waves reach our ears, we hear the noises and tones. The experts call everything we hear sound. Speed ​​of sound: Sound waves travel in the air at a speed of 343 meters per second. That corresponds to 1235 kilometers per hour, which is more than three times as fast as a Formula 1 car. If they hit an obstacle such as a rock wall, the sound waves are thrown back so that we can hear the sound again very quickly. Physicists say the rock wall reflected the sound. And they refer to the reflected sound as an echo. Sound or reverb? An echo can be heard all the more clearly, the fewer reflective surfaces there are, for example rock walls. With many reflective surfaces such as in a church, in a cave or under bridges, the sound waves are thrown back and forth so quickly that we can hear almost everything at the same time. It just echoes. Experts no longer speak of an echo, but of a reverberation. The distance from an obstacle also plays a role: for a word syllable to be reflected, you have to stand at least 17 meters away from the wall; for a whole word to be echoed, it needs at least 50 meters away.

Sound or reverb? The fewer reflective surfaces there are, the more clearly audible an echo is, for example rock walls. With many reflective surfaces, such as in a church, in a cave or under bridges, the sound waves are thrown back and forth so quickly that we can hear almost everything at the same time. Then it just echoes. Experts no longer speak of an echo, but of a reverberation. The distance from an obstacle also plays a role: for a word syllable to be reflected, you have to stand at least 17 meters away from the wall; for a whole word to be echoed, it needs at least 50 meters away.

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