Books should have age ratings

Literature shock positions itself. No tolerance for Nazis and fascistsbecause whoever marches next to these assholes is either a Nazi / Fascist himself or a useful puppet of them. There are no other categories.
  • Good question

    I've also seen films that I was too young for, but not horror films, I still don't like them to this day.
    When it comes to books, I haven't dared to go into "adult books" for a long time, I don't even know why. Wouldn't have a need

    But then it occurs to me:
    Our library is not divided (ok, but in floors), but you cannot borrow adult books or DVDs with your child or youth ID card (only special children's videos and DVDs).

  • There should really be something like that with books too. I've often run out of fantasy after reading a particularly creepy or exciting book ..

    Really rich is
    who has more dreams in his soul
    than can destroy reality.

  • I'm always a bit allergic to restrictions of any kind, it always reminds me of censorship.
    Especially in the case of films and PC games, the age information is sometimes sheer nonsense - but sometimes it is used really sensibly.

    I cannot imagine an age rating for books. If my son is still interested in books later on, I, as a mother, will pay attention to what he reads. Not necessarily to forbid him to do so, but to talk to him about it if necessary.

    I think it's a shame that books no longer have an age recommendation, as was previously the case with children's books. Amazon, for example, does not have any information and even a bookseller often does not provide clear information. In case of doubt, the only thing left to do is "read it yourself".

    best regards
    Tirah

  • Quote from "Sarah-HH"

    There should really be something like that with books too. I've often run out of fantasy after reading a particularly creepy or exciting book ..


    The only problem is that all children (and adults) are sensitive to very different books. One cannot take this, the other that, and both leave a third completely indifferent.
    I myself got nightmares after Disney's "Snow White" - an example of a film. So shouldn't it be better to ban the film for children under 12?

    No, I don't believe in bans. Who should decide, and according to which criteria, which books are allowed for which age group? I really believe that - should it really be necessary - it is up to parents to protect their children from "inappropriate" reading.

    We're crazy so we read!

  • How? There is no age recommendation on children's books today? I remember my childhood and youth with anger, when books were marked with such cryptic notations as "KM 12-14". Yes, yes, at that time there were even regulations as to which books were intended for boys (K = boys) and which were intended for girls. So whether reading the Schreckenstein books would have harmed me. I've always had the bossy way. (And it is thanks to the Five Friends that I decided when I was 12 that I no longer wanted to be a girl).

    As far as I know, there are reading age classifications in the libraries (4.xx for kids under 10, 5.xx for kids over 10 or so). But that has less to do with the content and more to do with linguistic maturity. In the library my sister works in, however, no attention is paid to which books kids borrow. They are also allowed to go with adult books.

    I also think that it is the parents' job to keep an eye on their offspring's reading and film enjoyment. Less through prohibitions, because what is forbidden irritates you all the more, but rather because they provide the little ones with age-appropriate reading. Age-appropriate is not the right word, because spiritual maturity also differs from child to child. From a certain degree of ripeness (sounds like I'm talking about cheese ) the child / young person should be able to determine what he or she reads.

    LG
    Rio

  • I think such an age rating is nonsense. An age recommendation is okay, although you have to differentiate from case to case. Some children are just more mature than others and can therefore do more with more complicated things. I went to the adult section of the Bibo quite early myself. (Sure, the children's department was searched. ) It would have been bad if I hadn't been allowed to borrow anything there.

    And bans only stimulate curiosity, that is clear. I think that as a parent you should take care of your offspring and, if necessary, discuss certain issues with them. But forbid? That is not how it works.
    And ultimately everyone has to have their own experiences. For example, I also enjoyed watching horror films as a child. With the result that afterwards I always found it difficult to fall asleep and soon left it on its own.

    I also think that descriptions of violence in books are not as dangerous as films. I don't mean to say that the scenes can't be very harsh anyway. (This one scene that Nimue described in the "American Psycho" thread, for example, was really disgusting and I'm sure there is a lot worse)
    But if you are really interested in such content, you WILL get it, no matter what the prohibitions are. And I also venture to say that these people are more likely to watch butchery films than to pick up appropriate books.

    And about Harry Potter: I think most grannies would not give their young grandson this brick, but rather something lighter. : smile:

  • My first reaction to the idea is to just not introduce a clearance. The index for books that best no one should read (depending on the prevailing beliefs that are reflected in it) may be OK.

    But I tend to have the feeling that people are increasingly being deprived of their own thinking - and I consider that to be fatal. The responsibility for upbringing lies imho with the parents - always. If these do not take their responsibility seriously, the hare is buried somewhere else.

    A wrong look does not have to be automatically harmful for a child and nimue also noted here that children develop their own protective mechanisms. I think that when the family as such is intact, sooner or later every aspect of a child's concern comes up for discussion. Why shouldn't the child chew a thought for two days?

    I have deliberately avoided the word "problem" because only those who have it can judge it as such. From the outside it can only be seen to a limited extent.

    ☞Desk tidier ☞Chief blog officer with lead type ☞Rainbow finder ☞Always on the #reading sofa

  • I didn't necessarily mean one either releaseEven with a release, the parents can offer the opportunity to circulate it if they think that your child has the necessary maturity to do so. A loan from the library could then be carried out by the mother, who then first has the opportunity to see what her offspring would like to read there.

    Of course, it's always the parents' job to take care of the media consumption of their offspring, but the FSK used to put me off and I've always seen that as a guideline. It is certainly true that some films are located there in a rather nonsensical way. Nevertheless, it is definitely true with the majority of the films ... and I would find that quite useful with books.

    It would make it easier for some parents to choose (of course, I don't mean us reading fanatics by that )...

    Quote from "Thanquola"


    But if you are really interested in such content, you WILL get it, no matter what the prohibitions are. And I also venture to say that these people are more likely to watch butchery films than read books about them.

    There are also those. But there are certainly also children who simply postpone reading. We're not just talking about defiant teenagers, we're talking about younger children as well.

    Quote from "Saltanah"


    The only problem is that all children (and adults) are sensitive to very different books. One cannot take this, the other that, and both leave a third completely indifferent.
    I myself got nightmares after Disney's "Snow White" - an example of a film. So shouldn't it be better to ban the film for children under 12?

    No, I don't believe in bans. Who should decide, and according to which criteria, which books are allowed for which age group? I really believe that if it is really necessary it is up to parents to protect their children from "inappropriate" reading.

    You're right. One can never lump everyone together, but most of them will.

    About who should decide ... maybe a committee of parents, educators, psychologists, etc. That would make sense to me. : smile:

    Quote from "Doris"


    I don't believe in age ratings for books. In my opinion, this would amount to the same situation as with the sale of alcohol to young people: the sales are the top priority for retailers, and they are hardly interested in whether children and young people are harmed by it. Who asks Amazon for age? When the bill is paid, anyone can order anything there. Another problem with bookstores is that sellers cannot possibly know the contents of all of the books they sell.

    I think that with amazon is rock-hard. Even 13-year-olds can set up an account there

    The sellers in the store would not have the problem with an age recommendation

  • Quote from "Bianca"

    I didn't necessarily mean one either release, whereby the parents can offer the possibility to walk around it even with a release, ...


    However, I see a catch: Approvals only make sense if they support the parents' goals and are not declared as bypassable from the outset. Take beer, for example: education and sales regulations are compliant. Mommy doesn't necessarily go out to get the child intoxicated (at least I hope )

    In any case, I misunderstood you - I thought you meant _approvals_, but you are purely about _recommendations_. Then I agree with you:

    Quote from "Bianca"

    It would make it easier for some parents to choose (of course, I don't mean us reading fanatics by that )...

    Quote from "Saltanah"

    The only problem is that all children (and adults) are sensitive to very different books. One cannot take this, the other that, and both leave a third completely indifferent.


    I consider this to be a fundamental problem with any assessment, as you always come across individual peculiarities. But _when_ you make a regulation (no matter which one) you have to accept that.

    Quote from "Doris & Bianca"

    Who asks Amazon for age? When the bill is paid, anyone can order anything there. & I think that with amazon, too, is rock hard. Even 13-year-olds can set up an account there


    At least banks have already fallen on the face of it.

    ☞Desk tidier ☞Chief blog officer with lead type ☞Rainbow finder ☞Always on the #reading sofa

  • I once read "Splatterpunk 2" and I have to admit, I already got naked horror, and that when I was about 22 years old. Then what about a teenager (I know someone who totally gets nightmares when she sees horror, regardless of the media).

    For some things it would be good if at least one would make a recommendation. It is difficult to follow, but with recommendations like this you can certainly achieve more than if nothing is written on it. Because there are still parents who care about what their children read (well, you can still hide it, but it would at least be a start) and could say, mmh only from 16, let's talk about it or something like that.

    It's really difficult to introduce anything at all, but it might be a possibility ...

  • Hello,

    When it came to the subject, I had to think of my 11th grade German teacher who said that she caught her 17-year-old (!) son reading "Seven" and then burning the book in the fireplace
    I thought that somehow ... sick!

    Age guidelines are certainly not bad for children's books, because if you, as a parent, have to read every single book, there is, in my opinion, the risk of imposing your own taste on your children.

    Best regards
    N.

  • Hello everybody!

    Quote from "Nevermore"

    Age guidelines are certainly not bad for children's books, because if you, as a parent, have to read every single book, there is, in my opinion, the risk of imposing your own taste on your children.


    Then prefer the taste of strangers?

    No, no: Parents shouldn't be allowed to slip out of responsibility so easily ...

    regards

    Sandhofer

    Where do I get all this time from not to read so much. (Karl Kraus)

  • Well, the age limit is not meant, hey, that's not my taste, that's why you didn't see FSK, but rather, sorry, but the violence is so bad now, that's why you didn't see FSK. And it doesn't matter who reads the book. The only question is, do all parents read? It is the case with mine, my mother is a reader and my father is a real grumpy reader. And with some, both are absolute grumpy readers. What do you do then?