How was the United States Army created

United States Army Criminal Investigation Command

The United States Army Criminal Investigation Command (USACIDC, common abbreviation: CID) is the United States Army military law enforcement agency serving the Criminal Investigation Divisions (CID) are subject to. This is possible because in the United States soldiers have a special military law, the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), are subject. The USACIDC is a command at division level and is subordinate to Direct reporting unit (Eng. "directly subordinate unit") not to one of the main commands of the US Army, but to the United States Army Provost Marshal Generalthat is directly to the Chief of Staff of the Army is subordinate to.

assignment

Jurisdiction

As a rule, the CID is responsible for investigations into all army-related crimes that are armed with a detention of more than a year. The United States Army Military Police is responsible for sentences of one year or less.

organization

Member of the CID in service
  • Headquarters of the USACIDC
    • Crime Lab, Fort Gillem, Georgia, 3rd Military Police Group
    • U.S. Army Crime Records Center - CRC, Fort Belvoir, Virginia[2]
    • 3rd Military Police Group - 3rd Military Police Group (MP), Fort Gillem in Forest Park, Georgia[3]
    • 202nd Military Police Group, Stem-Kaserne, Seckenheim (Germany)[4]
    • 6th Military Police Group, Fort Lewis (Washington state)[5]
    • 701st Military Police Group - 701st Military Police Group, Fort Belvoir, Virginia[6]
      • Major Procurement Fraud Unit, Fort Belvoir, Virginia
      • Protective Services Unit, Fort Belvoir, Virginia
      • Field Investigative Unit, Fort Belvoir, Virginia
        • Computer Crime Investigative Unit, Fort Belvoir, Virginia, responsible for cybercrime of military relevance

history

Emergence

Agents of CID during an exercise

During the American Civil War, the US Congress passed the enrollment act, which introduced a kind of conscription to provide the Union Army of the northern states with enough conscripts. Because this law led to riots and protests, US Secretary of War Stanton decided that a police force was required to enforce the new law. Therefore, in March 1863, the Provost Marshal General's Bureau (German about: Chief Police Chief General's Office) founded. This was responsible for the enforcement of the conscription law and to arrest deserters.

During the war, investigations into criminal offenses in the Army, such as theft of the payroll or murder, were carried out by private investigation agencies such as the Pinkerton Detective Agency, carried out. Major Allan Pinkerton was then authorized by Major General McClellan, the first Criminal Investigation Division to build up.

That stayed after the American Civil War Provost Marshal General's Bureau largely unchanged until the invasion of France by US troops (1917) during the First World War.

As the number of US soldiers in France increased, more police forces became necessary. In October 1917 that became Military Police Corps (MP Corps) created. The present-day military police emerged from this corps. Though that MP Corps, with its uniformed police force during World War I, lived up to its role, the crime rate nonetheless rose, so an investigative department was needed.

In November 1918, General John Pershing ordered that the Provost Marshal General of the US expeditionary forces one Criminal Investigation Division within the MP Corps should set up to detect and prevent crime in the US-American occupied territory. The CID was a division commander who acted as an advisor to the Provost Marshal General acted in administrative and technical matters. The operational command, however, remained with the individual senior police directors ("Provost Marshals"). There was therefore no central control of the investigative efforts within the CID. The individual investigators were poorly trained and inexperienced because they were recruited from the ranks of the respective military police command. In this phase was the CID responsible for investigating crimes committed by soldiers in the United States Armed Forces and crimes committed by others against the Allied Forces.

Between the First and Second World War, the staff of the United States Army was greatly reduced, so an investigative agency was no longer needed.

After the United States entered the war in December 1941, the United States Army rapidly transformed into a force in the millions. Since the United States Army was its own company and it was now growing rapidly, there was again the need for some kind of law enforcement agency.

In 1942, the investigation of crimes committed by military personnel was seen as the task of the commander of the respective unit in the form of the military police units. Therefore, the commander of the relevant unit was responsible for investigating criminal offenses. But as the United States Army grew, so did the crime rate. The commanders had neither the personnel nor the means to carry out adequate investigations. Hence the office of the Provost Marshal General Authorized in December 1943 to be the supervisory staff unit for all criminal offense investigations. Two months later, in January 1944, the Criminal Investigation Division of The Provost Marshal General's Office founded. She was responsible for all criminal investigations, the coordination of investigations between individual commandos and the preparation of protocols and guidelines for the investigators.

After the Second World War, the CID a main command. During the 1950s, however, the investigative staff was decentralized and assigned to the individual regional commands. During the Provost Marshal General So had the command of all criminal investigations, the investigators were commanded from the lower level, namely by the individual commandos of the United States Army.

A Department of Defense study called "Project Security Shield" however, from 1964 indicated that all investigative efforts needed to be centralized in order to function more efficiently and globally.

In 1965 the United States Army took its first steps towards centralizing the CID-Elements. The individual commands were in CID-Brigades (CID groups - This refers to a brigade / group consisting of six to eight battalions) subdivided under the regional United States Army command. In the following year, this concept was also implemented by US troops in Europe and the Far East.

However, this brigade concept did not completely solve the problems, so in 1969 on the orders of the Chief of Staff of the United States Army the US Army Criminal Investigation Agency created and under the direct command of the Provost Marshal General posed. This command monitored everyone CID-Operations. The Agency but had no authority, but was only created to work out regulations.

In March 1971, US Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird ordered that Secretary of the ArmyStanley R. Resor a CID-Command authority to be established. Therefore, in September of the same year, the US Army Criminal Investigation Command created and settled as the main command. It was in command of all criminal investigations and CID- Equipped with resources, they ensured central control and communication with the civilian governments of other countries.

today

USACIDC is headquartered in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. On October 29, 2003, after 29 years, the position of Provost Marshal General (German about "General of the Military Police Force") reoccupied. The post was taken over by Donald J. Ryder, who also investigated the Abu Ghuraib torture scandal during the 2003 Iraq war.

Current commander of the USACIDC (United States Army Provost Marshal General and Commander of the United States Army Criminal Investigation Command) has been Major General David E. Quantock since September 28, 2011. Around 2,000 soldiers and civilian employees as well as around 900 special agents (special agents); these agents are usually Warrant Officer.

The USACIDC's motto is “Do what has to be done” (German: “Do what has to be done”).

In the media

In the American television series produced since 2003NCIS the CID played a certain role in some episodes, in the form of Army Lt. Col. Hollis Mann Portrayed by actress Susanna Thompson.

The CID also investigates the murder of a female captain in the film Defenseless - The General's Daughter (1999). The investigating warrant officers are represented by John Travolta and Madeleine Stowe.

See also

Web links

Individual evidence

  1. ↑ www.cid.army.mil (Memento of the original from March 2, 2010 in Internet Archive) Info: The archive link was inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check the original and archive link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.@ 1 @ 2 Template: Webachiv / IABot / www.cid.army.mil CID Command Group> CID Commanding General. Accessed December 31, 2012.
  2. ↑ CID - CRC (Memento of the original dated June 8, 2007 in Internet Archive) Info: The archive link was inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check the original and archive link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.@ 1 @ 2 Template: Webachiv / IABot / www.cid.army.mil (English)
  3. ↑ CID - 3rd Military Police Group (CID) (Memento of the original dated June 4, 2007 in Internet Archive) Info: The archive link was inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check the original and archive link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.@ 1 @ 2 Template: Webachiv / IABot / www.cid.army.mil (English)
  4. ↑ CID - 202nd Military Police Group (CID) (Memento of the original dated June 8, 2007 in Internet Archive) Info: The archive link was inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check the original and archive link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.@ 1 @ 2 Template: Webachiv / IABot / www.cid.army.mil (English)
  5. ↑ CID - 6th Military Police Group (CIC) (Memento of the original from July 9, 2006 in Internet Archive) Info: The archive link was inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check the original and archive link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.@ 1 @ 2 Template: Webachiv / IABot / www.lewis.army.mil (English)
  6. ↑ CID - 701st Military Police Group (CID) (Memento of the original dated June 5, 2007 in Internet Archive) Info: The archive link was inserted automatically and has not yet been checked. Please check the original and archive link according to the instructions and then remove this notice.@ 1 @ 2 Template: Webachiv / IABot / www.cid.army.mil (English)