Trump likes Jewish people

Donald Trump and America's Jews : "You are not nice, but you have to choose me"

On Saturday evening, Donald Trump spoke at an Israeli American Council event in Florida. First, he praised himself for his policy towards Israel. "In contrast to all other American presidents, I kept my promises," he said, listing his achievements: withdrawing from the international nuclear agreement with Iran, relocating the US embassy to Jerusalem, and recognizing Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights . "Israel has never had a better friend in the White House than me."

Then Trump praised the married couple Miriam and Sheldon Adelson, who hosted the event. The Adelsons are casino billionaires from Las Vegas who gave massive support to both Trump's 2016 presidential campaign and the Republican Party in the congressional election.

Trump continued somewhat cryptically: “We have to get the people of this country to love Israel more. Because there are Jews who are great people, who do not love Israel enough. ”One hears and amazes: The US President accuses some American Jews of not loving Israel intensely enough. The cliché of double loyalty resonates, which in this case, according to Trump, is just not strong enough.

There was criticism from Jewish organizations

But it got even coarser. "Many of you are in the real estate business, I know you very well, you are brutal murderers," said Trump. “They're not nice people at all. But you have to choose me because you have no other choice. ”Ultimately, the Democrats, including presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, planned a hundred percent wealth tax. This is not true, but Trump likes to spread it. "Even if you don't like me, you will be my biggest supporter because if the Democrats come to power you will be broke in 15 minutes."

Other anti-Semitic topoi resonate here: Jews are rich, brutal, not nice, and they base their political preferences on financial criteria. All of this is said not by a neo-Nazi, but by Donald Trump, the most powerful man in the world. There was prompt criticism from Jewish organizations. But there was no broad social debate about anti-Semitism.

One reason for this could be the widespread misconception that someone who emphatically supports the extreme nationalism of a Greater Israel idea cannot be an anti-Semite. The hope of many European right-wing populists - from Viktor Orban to Geert Wilders to Matteo Salvini - is based on this mistaken belief that they will be cleared of the charge of anti-Semitism through a demonstrative confession of Israel. One has nothing to do with the other. The Jewish investor and philanthropist George Soros is an enemy for many conspiracy theorists and right-wing populists. They made its name the “code word” of their anti-Semitism, comparable to the “East Coast Press” or the “Rothschilds”.

America’s Jews vote for the Democrats by the majority

In this sense, Trump's Israel policy could also be an expression of his idea that, as “Israel's best friend”, he would benefit from a fabulous “power of the Jews”. His love for Israel would therefore be a result of anti-Jewish resentment. In August the US President said: "All Jews in America who vote for Democrats are in my eyes either totally clueless or show great disloyalty." And in the 2015 election campaign he called out to members of the "Republican Jewish Coalition": “You won't support me because I don't want your money. You want to control your politicians, that's fine. "

The majority of America's Jews are firm supporters of the Democrats - much to the displeasure of the Republicans. Hence, a second reason for Trump's Israel policy is likely to be the attitude of his most loyal supporters, the conservative evangelicals. They believe that God has given the entire biblical land to the Jewish people, they reject territorial compromises. It is frightening how undisturbed such an obsession can go hand in hand with the spread of anti-Semitic clichés.

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